Archive | December, 2009

Social Media Brings in NYE Fashion

28 Dec

Gift-giving season is over and we now set our sights on the New Year’s Eve trends. After one day of digesting the holiday dinners and potlucks, we’re now on the search for sequins and shiny fabrics for the best price. Shoppers are looking for a deal and researching through their social media networks to get the inside scoop.

As of two days after Christmas, Nordstrom is strictly pushing NYE accessories through Twitter and Facebook. Rather than publicizing glitzy and expensive dresses, this strategy is right on the money in the current economy. @Nordstrom features cocktail rings for all budgets; an easy fix to accessorize an ensemble without buying an entire new look.

On the other hand, Hayden-Harnett is featuring dresses through social media, but they too are aware of the small pockets after holiday shopping. Posting the day after Christmas, @Hayden_Harnett tweets, “Dresses perfect for NYE and far beyond! http://ow.ly/QcwN.” The Web site features Hayden-Harnett top NYE picks, all with up to 30 percent discounts.

Thinking from the consumer’s perspective is key to social media success. Both Nordstrom and Hayden-Harnett have proactively posted to various social media tools before the work week begins. These brands are anticipating the customer to stop thinking of others the moment Christmas is over. Sadly, their prediction is correct! Consumers move quickly– once holiday shopping ends, NYE shopping begins.

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Pitching to Santa Claus: How To Pitch in the Current Market

23 Dec

It’s not about the must-have Tickle Me Elmo this year, it’s about the savings. This year, pitching holiday gift guides was much different from years past. It was important to be cognizant of the economic climate and to position products by highlighting  the added value or the savings.

When pitching a product, it’s necessary to understand the current environment. Public relations professionals must keep current on news and current events. Whether it is the Tiger Woods scandal or the health care reform, both events can play an important part in pitching any product.

Pitching is much more than picking up the phone, dialing a number and saying, “Hello, I’m so and so calling on behalf of blank.” Here’s a few things to remember for your next pitch:

1. Conduct a media audit. Research the journalist and their particular beat. Read at least six of their articles and find a commonality. Thoroughly investigating their writing builds trust in the future conversation.

2. Practice makes perfect. It might seem silly to close the door and read your pitch out loud, but give it a try! I promise this will command more respect over the phone -confidence is key when selling a product or idea.

3. Tailor your pitch. It’s o.k. to have a universal pitch, but when you have completed your research, it’s important to personalize  the conversation to create an open dialogue.

4. Lead with a current industry trend or event. Get in the trenches with your journalists. These people are constantly scouring the news for the next best story. If you are as up to speed as they are, then you can lend more credibility.

Also, check out fashion PR blogger Yuli Ziv sharing her e-mail tips on making your pitch blogger friendly. And, if you’re wondering how not to pitch, check out The Bad Pitch Blog for the best examples. Hopefully you don’t find your pitch posted!

How do you prepare to pitch? Share your tips and stories and have a fabulous holiday, fashionistas!

Branding The Real(ity) You

3 Dec

As markets become more and more saturated, it is important to brand yourself as an individual. Emerging new technologies, social media tools, the current job market and reality television are all forces bringing people closer together in a survival of the fittest.

Examples of successful personal branding include pioneers like Karl Lagerfeld, Anna Wintour and Paris Hilton. These people are more than designers, editors and socialites: they are brands. @LakiaGordon explains, “make sure your everyday appearance is reflective of your brand. Promote your passion daily because you never know who you’ll meet.”

It’s also crucial to surround yourself with similar brands and people to help drive your identity. @derville shares her advice, “establish a niche area of specialization. Follow and interact with others in that niche area. Blog and tweet about your area.”

Lastly, give people something tangible like industry news, images, product, or a portfolio of work. @adamstahr shares,  “when branding yourself, don’t underestimate the importance of a body of work. Be a doer, not merely a thinker and talker.”

Incorporating these practices into daily life will create your personal brand and place you in the forefront of your niche. What other ways do you brand yourself?

photos from davidonoue.com, CuteCarry.wordpress.com , Lexposure.net